The new pirates: modern global piracy from Somalia to the South China Sea

Piracy is a significant global threat to international sea-borne trade - the life-blood of modern industrial economies and vital for world economic survival. The pirates of today are constantly in the world's news media, preying on private and merchant shipping from small, high-speed vessels. T...

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Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Palmer, Andrew
Contributors: Thompson, Julian (Other)
Format: Print Book
Language:English
Published: London [u.a.] Tauris 2014
Online Access: Cover
Table of Contents
Availability in Tübingen:Present in Tübingen.
UB: KB 20 A 7173
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Summary:Piracy is a significant global threat to international sea-borne trade - the life-blood of modern industrial economies and vital for world economic survival. The pirates of today are constantly in the world's news media, preying on private and merchant shipping from small, high-speed vessels. Their targets range from small private yachts - with harrowing stories of individuals faced with seemingly impossible ransom demands- to huge ocean-going tankers and container ships transporting oil and gas, or consumer goods from the new industrial giants in Asia. The 'new' pirates are far from the brutal but romantic figures of popular legend. They are sophisticated operators who have undergone training courses, have advanced weaponry, are radar equipped with electronic tracking devices, have access to onboard advance information, run a highly organized system of motherships and fast-moving skiffs and even form companies enjoying covert state support with access to international finance. But actions can be as horrific as any historical episode, with crews being murdered and whole cargoes being seized. The threat is growing: the International Maritime Bureau recorded 217 attacks from Somali pirates in 2009. Somalia is considered the nest of piracy but hotspots include not only the Red Sea region, but also the whole Indian Ocean, West Africa, Latin America, Southeast Asia, and the South China Seas. Andrew Palmer here provides the historical background to the new piracy, its impact on the shipping and insurance industries and also considers the role of international bodies like the UN and the International Maritime Bureau, international law and the development of advanced naval and military measures. He shows how this 'new' piracy is rooted in the geopolitics and socio-economic conditions of the late-20th century where populations live on the margins and where weak or 'failed states' can encourage criminal activity and even international terrorism. -- Publisher description
Piracy is a significant global threat to international sea-borne trade - the life-blood of modern industrial economies and vital for world economic survival. The pirates of today are constantly in the world's news media, preying on private and merchant shipping from small, high-speed vessels. Their targets range from small private yachts - with harrowing stories of individuals faced with seemingly impossible ransom demands- to huge ocean-going tankers and container ships transporting oil and gas, or consumer goods from the new industrial giants in Asia. The 'new' pirates are far from the brutal but romantic figures of popular legend. They are sophisticated operators who have undergone training courses, have advanced weaponry, are radar equipped with electronic tracking devices, have access to onboard advance information, run a highly organized system of motherships and fast-moving skiffs and even form companies enjoying covert state support with access to international finance. But actions can be as horrific as any historical episode, with crews being murdered and whole cargoes being seized. The threat is growing: the International Maritime Bureau recorded 217 attacks from Somali pirates in 2009. Somalia is considered the nest of piracy but hotspots include not only the Red Sea region, but also the whole Indian Ocean, West Africa, Latin America, Southeast Asia, and the South China Seas. Andrew Palmer here provides the historical background to the new piracy, its impact on the shipping and insurance industries and also considers the role of international bodies like the UN and the International Maritime Bureau, international law and the development of advanced naval and military measures. He shows how this 'new' piracy is rooted in the geopolitics and socio-economic conditions of the late-20th century where populations live on the margins and where weak or 'failed states' can encourage criminal activity and even international terrorism. -- Publisher description
Physical Description:XII, 377 S. Ill., graph. Darst. 232 mm x 160 mm
ISBN:9780857734938
9781848856332