Citizen willingness to report wildlife crime

Poaching hotline programs are a common tactic employed by wildlife enforcement agencies across the country, but their effectiveness has received limited attention by the academic community. This study explores citizen willingness to report wildlife crime and the degree to which this willingness is i...

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Bibliographic Details
Authors: Leavitt, Kelsie (Author) ; Wodahl, Eric J. (Author) ; Schweitzer, Kimberly (Author)
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
Published: 2021
In: Deviant behavior
Year: 2021, Volume: 42, Issue: 10, Pages: 1256-1272
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Summary:Poaching hotline programs are a common tactic employed by wildlife enforcement agencies across the country, but their effectiveness has received limited attention by the academic community. This study explores citizen willingness to report wildlife crime and the degree to which this willingness is influenced by hotline programmatic features, as well as individual characteristics and attitudes of the observer. Data come from online survey responses from adults living in the Western U.S. after their exposure to vignettes. Findings revealed an overwhelming willingness among respondents to report observed poaching behavior, and that this willingness was not dependent on receiving an economic reward. Multivariate analyses found that willingness to report was influenced by several factors, including the observer’s financial situation and his/her attitudes and values toward wildlife. Policy implications and directions for future research are discussed.
Item Description:Literaturverzeichnis: Seite 1269-1272
Physical Description:Diagramme
ISSN:1521-0456
DOI:10.1080/01639625.2020.1738643