Is the Foster Care-Crime Relationship a Consequence of Exposure? Examining Potential Moderating Factors

Youth who are dually involved in both foster care and criminal justice systems represent a small minority of individuals with multi-problem risk profiles. Prior research has found that foster care youth are disproportionately more likely to be chronic offenders in both adolescence and emerging adult...

Full description

Saved in:
Bibliographic Details
Published in:Youth violence and juvenile justice
Main Author: Yang, Jennifer
Contributors: McCuish, Evan C. (VerfasserIn); Corrado, Raymond R. (Author)
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
Published: 2021
In:Youth violence and juvenile justice
Year: 2021, Volume: 19, Issue: 1, Pages: 94-112
Online Access: Volltext (Resolving-System)
Journals Online & Print:
Drawer...
Check availability: HBZ Gateway
Keywords:
Description
Summary:Youth who are dually involved in both foster care and criminal justice systems represent a small minority of individuals with multi-problem risk profiles. Prior research has found that foster care youth are disproportionately more likely to be chronic offenders in both adolescence and emerging adulthood. However, the nature of this relationship remains theoretically underexplored and empirically underexamined, especially with respect to risk factors that may moderate the relationship. Using data from the Incarcerated Serious and Violent Young Offender Study, the criminal offending trajectories of 678 incarcerated youth were examined. A history of foster care predicted membership in a high rate chronic offending trajectory. This relationship was not moderated by parental maltreatment, negative self-identity, involvement in gang activity, or substance use versatility. Findings suggested a greater need for ongoing support for foster care youth during their transition to adulthood, regardless of their exposure to a range of other negative life circumstances.
ISSN:1556-9330
DOI:10.1177/1541204020939643