Examining Police Officer Work Stress Using the Job Demands–Resources Model

Policing has long been recognized as a stressful, emotionally trying, and sometimes dangerous occupation. Job stress is related to several harmful outcomes for officers, and ultimately police organizations. The present study empirically examined the applicability of the job demands-resources model t...

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Bibliographic Details
Published in:Journal of contemporary criminal justice
Main Author: Frank, James (Author)
Other Authors: Qureshi, Hanif (Author); Lambert, Eric G.
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
Published: 2017
In:Journal of contemporary criminal justice
Year: 2017, Volume: 33, Issue: 4, Pages: 348-367
Online Access: Volltext (Resolving-System)
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Summary:Policing has long been recognized as a stressful, emotionally trying, and sometimes dangerous occupation. Job stress is related to several harmful outcomes for officers, and ultimately police organizations. The present study empirically examined the applicability of the job demands-resources model to explain levels of work stress experienced by a sample of police officers in India. Survey data collected from 827 officers in the Indian state of Haryana were examined to determine the impact of five job demands and four job resources on work stress. Our findings suggest that role ambiguity, role conflict, and role overload are associated with higher levels of officer stress, whereas organizational support, formalization, and employee input in decision making are all associated with lower levels of stress. The implications of our findings for policing and the job demands-resources model are also discussed.
ISSN:1552-5406
DOI:10.1177/1043986217724248