The Individual-Level Deterrent Effect of “Call-In” Meetings on Time to Re-Arrest

Focused on deterrence popular model to address community-level violence, however little research has examined the individual-level effect of deterrent messaging on subsequent offending. To answer this question, we utilize data on 254 gang- and group-involved probationers and parolees who attended of...

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Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Circo, Giovanni
Contributors: McGarrell, Edmund F. (Author) ; DeBiasi, Alaina (Author) ; Krupa, Julie M. (Author)
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
Published: 2020
In:Crime & delinquency
Year: 2020, Volume: 66, Issue: 11, Pages: 1630-1651
Online Access: Volltext (Resolving-System)
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Summary:Focused on deterrence popular model to address community-level violence, however little research has examined the individual-level effect of deterrent messaging on subsequent offending. To answer this question, we utilize data on 254 gang- and group-involved probationers and parolees who attended offender “call-in” meetings as part of the Detroit Ceasefire. We employ inverse-probability weighting to construct a counterfactual comparison group from a sample of gang-involved young adults who were not subject to the Ceasefire call-in. We then use a Cox regression to estimate time to re-arrest. We find that individuals who were delivered a deterrent message at a call-in meeting had a longer time to re-arrest compared to a weighted comparison group for up to 3 years following the meeting.
ISSN:1552-387X