More Mind Games: how ‘The Action’ and ‘The Odds’ have Changed in Prison

Surviving prison has always involved ‘action’ and game playing. Higher stakes—‘life-trashing sentences’, the fear and risk of radicalization, increased incidences of homicide and labyrinth routes out—have compounded the experience of struggle: to be heard, for dignity, against exposure to violent in...

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Bibliographic Details
Published in:The British journal of criminology
Main Author: Liebling, Alison (Author)
Other Authors: Lieber, Elinor (Author); Williams, Ryan
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
Published: [2020]
In:The British journal of criminology
Year: 2020, Volume: 60, Issue: 6, Pages: 1648–1666
Online Access: Volltext (Resolving-System)
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Summary:Surviving prison has always involved ‘action’ and game playing. Higher stakes—‘life-trashing sentences’, the fear and risk of radicalization, increased incidences of homicide and labyrinth routes out—have compounded the experience of struggle: to be heard, for dignity, against exposure to violent injustice, and for release; the wrestling of ‘the self’ against a bleak and unyielding bureaucracy. In this article, we revisit McDermott and King’s Mind Games: Where the Action is in Prison showing how long-term prisoners are exposed to unregulated, unfathomable forms of power and action, and how long-term imprisonment feels increasingly like being ‘abandoned by humanity.’
ISSN:1464-3529
DOI:10.1093/bjc/azaa046