Risk and protective factors of delinquency that are sensitive to migration and culture

Present evidence regarding widely used risk assessment tools suggests that such tools may have inferior predictive validity for offenders with a migration background (MB), especially from Turkey and Arab countries. Based on a thorough literature review, we investigated additional risk and protective...

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Published in:Psychology, crime & law
Main Author: Schmidt, Stefanie (Author)
Contributors: Meer, Elke van der (Author); Bliesener, Thomas
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
Published: [2019]
In:Psychology, crime & law
Year: 2019, Volume: 25, Issue: 8, Pages: 847-873
Online Access: Volltext (Resolving-System)
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Summary:Present evidence regarding widely used risk assessment tools suggests that such tools may have inferior predictive validity for offenders with a migration background (MB), especially from Turkey and Arab countries. Based on a thorough literature review, we investigated additional risk and protective factors via a postdictive correlational study design. We assumed that delinquency is induced by discrimination, a conflict of values, norms of honour, a disapproval of sexual self-determination, and antisemitism. In contrast, we expected social support to diminish the risk of criminal behaviour. The sampling took place inside and outside prison, where adult men with an Arab or Turkish MB (n = 140) filled out a questionnaire. Individual norms of honour (r = .27−.41), antisemitism (r = .31−.37), and a disapproval of sexual self-determination (r = .23−.26) were positively correlated with delinquency. The best predictor was the individual’s perception of friends’ norms of honour (r = .34−.56). However, only a few significant correlations were found for a perception of individual discrimination (r = .08−.14) and an internal conflict of values (r = .11−.15), whereas global discrimination (r = .20−.29) clearly emerged as a risk factor for delinquency. Social support by nondelinquent peers could be confirmed as having a protective influence against delinquency (r=−.25−.27). Theoretical and practical implications for risk assessment are discussed.
ISSN:1477-2744
DOI:10.1080/1068316X.2019.1597088