Police perceptions of ADHD in youth interviewees

Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in witness-victim/suspect interviews holds strong relevance for policing. Four purpose-written vignettes were used to test the extent to which ADHD interviewee behaviour impacts on the work of 46 experienced Australian detectives and their ability to i...

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Bibliographic Details
Published in:Psychology, crime & law
Main Author: Cunial, Kimberley J. (Author)
Other Authors: Kebbell, Mark R. (Author)
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
Published: 2017
In:Psychology, crime & law
Year: 2017, Volume: 23, Issue: 5, Pages: 509-526
Online Access: Volltext (Resolving-System)
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Summary:Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in witness-victim/suspect interviews holds strong relevance for policing. Four purpose-written vignettes were used to test the extent to which ADHD interviewee behaviour impacts on the work of 46 experienced Australian detectives and their ability to identify ADHD as a likely diagnosis. Detectives reported frequently encountering ADHD-type interviewees in their work; perceiving such interviewees to be at a very significant risk of future contact with the criminal justice system; and perceiving ADHD-type behaviour to exert a highly significant impact on interviewing time efficiency as well as quality. Detectives gave highly significant ratings of ADHD as a likely explanation of vignettes describing ADHD-type behaviour for witness-victims as well as suspects. However, they could not identify ADHD as the most likely explanation over and above other possibilities. Implications are discussed in terms of a rationale for future research targeting police awareness and training needs in ADHD.
ISSN:1477-2744
DOI:10.1080/1068316X.2017.1284216