Using Longitudinal Self-Report Data to Study the Age-Crime Relationship

Given the growing reliance on longitudinal self-report data for making causal inferences about crime, it is essential to investigate whether the within-individual change in criminal involvement exists and is not a measurement artifact driven by attrition or survey fatigue—a very real possibility fir...

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Published in:Journal of quantitative criminology
Main Author: Kim, Jaeok (Author)
Other Authors: Bushway, Shawn (Author)
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
Published: 2018
In:Journal of quantitative criminology
Year: 2018, Volume: 34, Issue: 2, Pages: 367-396
Online Access: Volltext (Resolving-System)
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Summary:Given the growing reliance on longitudinal self-report data for making causal inferences about crime, it is essential to investigate whether the within-individual change in criminal involvement exists and is not a measurement artifact driven by attrition or survey fatigue—a very real possibility first identified by Lauritsen (Soc Forces 77(1):127-154, 1998) using the National Youth Survey (NYS). The current study examines whether the same threats to the validity of within-individual change in criminal involvement exist in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 cohort (NLSY97).
ISSN:1573-7799
DOI:10.1007/s10940-017-9338-9