Structural Constraints, Risky Lifestyles, and Repeat Victimization

Research indicates that victims who make changes to their risky behavioral routines are better able to avoid being victimized again in the future. Nevertheless, some victims' abilities to change their behaviors may be limited by what Hindelang et al. in Victims of personal crime: an empirical f...

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Bibliographic Details
Published in:Journal of quantitative criminology
Main Author: Turanovic, Jillian J. (Author)
Other Authors: Pratt, Travis C. (Author); Piquero, Alex R.
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
Published: 2018
In:Journal of quantitative criminology
Year: 2018, Volume: 34, Issue: 1, Pages: 251-274
Online Access: Volltext (Resolving-System)
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Summary:Research indicates that victims who make changes to their risky behavioral routines are better able to avoid being victimized again in the future. Nevertheless, some victims' abilities to change their behaviors may be limited by what Hindelang et al. in Victims of personal crime: an empirical foundation for a theory of personal victimization. Ballinger, Cambridge (1978) referred to as "structural constraints." To assess this issue, we determine: (1) whether victims who reside in communities characterized by structural constraints (e.g., concentrated disadvantage) are more likely to continue engaging in risky behaviors (e.g., offending, illicit drug use, and getting drunk) after being victimized; and (2) whether victims who continue to engage in risky lifestyles have an increased likelihood of repeat victimization.
ISSN:1573-7799
DOI:10.1007/s10940-016-9334-5