The influence of earlier parental violence on juvenile delinquency: the role of social bonds, self-control, delinquent peer association and moral values as mediators

Previous research demonstrated that children who had been exposed to physical maltreatment by parents are at higher risk of using violence as adolescents. It is assumed that parental violence unfolds negative influences on later delinquency directly and indirectly, that is, mediated through other cr...

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Published in:European journal on criminal policy and research
Main Author: Manzoni, Patrik (Author)
Other Authors: Schwarzenegger, Christian (Author)
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
Published: 2019
In:European journal on criminal policy and research
Year: 2019, Volume: 25, Issue: 3, Pages: 225-239
Online Access: Volltext (Verlag)
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Summary:Previous research demonstrated that children who had been exposed to physical maltreatment by parents are at higher risk of using violence as adolescents. It is assumed that parental violence unfolds negative influences on later delinquency directly and indirectly, that is, mediated through other crime predictors. This contribution presents an empirical test of theoretical propositions explaining this cycle of violence derived from three major theories, namely social learning, self-control and social control/bonding theory. Using data from 26 countries of the ISRD3 study, the mediating roles of delinquent peer association, crime-related moral values, self-control as well as family and school bonds among juveniles of grades 7 to 9 are assessed. Moreover, with exploratory intent, it is tested if the same mediating effects apply to each country. Overall the results showed both a significant direct effect of maltreatment on the use of violence and indirect (mediating) effects via each of the considered mediators. Delinquent peer association, self-control and family bonds had higher mediational strength than moral values and school bonds. This is in support of the theoretical assumptions of all three theories. Further, great variability of direct, indirect and total effects of maltreatment on violence across countries and within each mediator were observed. There is tentative evidence that the prevalence rates of maltreatment are negatively associated with the impact of maltreatment on later violence in the considered countries.
ISSN:1572-9869
DOI:10.1007/s10610-018-9392-3