More cops, fewer prisoners?

The results reported in a large amount of the criminology literature reveal that hiring police officers leads to reductions in crime and that investments in police are an efficient means of crime control compared with investments in prisons. One concern, however, is that because police officers make...

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Published in:Criminology & public policy
Main Author: Kaplan, Jacob (Author)
Other Authors: Chalfin, Aaron (Author)
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
Published: 2019
In:Criminology & public policy
Year: 2019, Volume: 18, Issue: 1, Pages: 171-200
Online Access: Volltext (Verlag)
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Summary:The results reported in a large amount of the criminology literature reveal that hiring police officers leads to reductions in crime and that investments in police are an efficient means of crime control compared with investments in prisons. One concern, however, is that because police officers make arrests in the course of their duties, police hiring, albeit efficient, is an inevitable driver of “mass incarceration.” In this article, we consider the dynamics through which police hiring affects downstream incarceration rates.
ISSN:1745-9133
DOI:10.1111/1745-9133.12424