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Without fear or shame: Lynching, capital punishment and the subculture of violence in the American south

Recent studies of lynching have focused on structural theories that have been tested with demographic, economic and electoral data without much explanatory success. This article suggests that lynching was largely a reflection of a facilitating subculture of violence within which these atrocities wer...

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Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Clarke, James W.
Format: Print Article
Language:English
Published: 1998
In:British journal of political science
Year: 1998, Volume: 28, Issue: 2, Pages: 269-289
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Keywords:
USA
Description
Summary:Recent studies of lynching have focused on structural theories that have been tested with demographic, economic and electoral data without much explanatory success. This article suggests that lynching was largely a reflection of a facilitating subculture of violence within which these atrocities were situationally determined by cultural factors not reported in census and economic tabulations, or election returns. Lynching declined in the twentieth century, in part, as a result of segregation and disfranchisement policies, but mainly because state executioners replaced lynch mobs in carrying out the will of the white majority. (British Journal of Political Science / FUB)
Physical Description:graph. Darst., Tab., Lit.Hinw.
ISSN:0007-1234