Linking local labor market opportunity to violent adolescent delinquency

Most criminological theory is cast at either the macro or micro level. Developmental and integrated theories are an exception as they combine community characteristics such as neighborhood poverty with micro-level processes. What remains lacking, however, is attention to labor market conditions. The...

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Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Bellair, Paul E.
Contributors: Roscigno, Vincent J. (Author); McNulty, Thomas L. (Author)
Format: Electronic/Print Article
Language:English
Published: 2003
In:Journal of research in crime and delinquency
Year: 2003, Volume: 40, Issue: 1, Pages: 6-33
Online Access: Presumably Free Access
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Availability in Tübingen:Present in Tübingen.
IFK: In: Z 31
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Summary:Most criminological theory is cast at either the macro or micro level. Developmental and integrated theories are an exception as they combine community characteristics such as neighborhood poverty with micro-level processes. What remains lacking, however, is attention to labor market conditions. The authors address this gap by testing a contextual model that links local labor market structure, adolescent attachments, and violent delinquency. Analyses draw from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Our findings suggest that low-wage, service sector employment opportunity directly increases the likelihood of violent delinquency. A small proportion of this effect is mediated by school achievement and attachment. The low-wage service sector effect uncovered remains when important micro-level processes including prior violence are controlled. The authors conclude by discussing the persistent low-wage service sector effect, the intervening processes we do uncover, and implications for future theoretical development and research on local labor markets
ISSN:0022-4278