Inhibition, Motivation and Self-Reported Involvement in Drinking and Driving Behavior

In spite of the fact that deterrence theory is grounded in a utilitarian perspective that assumes that individuals consider both rewards (motivation) and costs (inhibition) in decisions to engage in illegal behavior, perceptual deterrence research has devoted little attention to individual motivatio...

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Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Green, D. E.
Format: Electronic/Print Article
Language:English
Published: 1991
In:Criminal justice review
Year: 1991, Volume: 16, Issue: 1, Pages: 1-16
Online Access: doi
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Summary:In spite of the fact that deterrence theory is grounded in a utilitarian perspective that assumes that individuals consider both rewards (motivation) and costs (inhibition) in decisions to engage in illegal behavior, perceptual deterrence research has devoted little attention to individual motivation. This study attempts to assess the relationships between motivators and inhibitors of illegal behavior by testing both additive and interactive models using a random sample of adult respondents from a large Midwestern metropolitan area. Moreover, in response to a continuing controversy over the appropriate design for perceptual deterrence research (that is, cross-sectional vs. longitudinal), this study compares models employing both cross-sectional and longitudinal measures of self-reported drinking and driving behavior. Findings suggest that, regardless of the measure of illegal behavior, an additive model is better able to account for both motivation and inhibition effects than an interactive model. The implications of these results for modern deterrence theory research are also addressed
ISSN:0734-0168