Truth Commissions and the Recognitions of State Crime

This article seeks to analyse the conditions by which state crime comes to be recognized or mis-recognized, particularly through truth commission proceedings. Truth commissions, established in transitions to democracy, often provide the most authoritative documents on state crime. While this recogni...

Full description

Saved in:  
Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Stanley, Elizabeth
Format: Electronic/Print Article
Language:Undetermined language
Published: 2005
In:The British journal of criminology
Year: 2005, Volume: 45, Issue: 4, Pages: 582--597
Online Access: doi
Journals Online & Print:
Drawer...
Availability in Tübingen:Present in Tübingen.
IFK: In: Z 7
Check availability: HBZ Gateway
Keywords:
Description
Summary:This article seeks to analyse the conditions by which state crime comes to be recognized or mis-recognized, particularly through truth commission proceedings. Truth commissions, established in transitions to democracy, often provide the most authoritative documents on state crime. While this recognition of state crime presents an opportunity to challenge popular perceptions and power relations, this approach is commonly detached from the linked imperative of social justice. Building on the work of Nancy Fraser (1997; 2000; 2003) and the author's own primary research, the article details that while truth commissions expose a partial truth' of state crime, they inhibit recognition of status subordination that would allow a challenge to institutionalized patterns of inequality, discrimination and oppression
ISSN:0007-0955