A Re-Conviction Study of Special (High Security) Hospital Patients

Reliable patient re-conviction data after leaving high security hospitals are of public interest, but official statistics are without context and sometimes incomplete. Some patient sub-groups are rarely studied. Our study describes re-convictions for a complete national annual high security hospital...

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Bibliographic Details
Published in:The British journal of criminology
Main Author: Jamieson, Liz
Contributors: Taylor, Pamela J. (Author)
Format: Electronic/Print Article
Language:English
Published: 2004
In:The British journal of criminology
Year: 2004, Volume: 44, Issue: 5, Pages: 783-802
Online Access: doi
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Availability in Tübingen:Present in Tübingen.
IFK: In: Z 7
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Summary:Reliable patient re-conviction data after leaving high security hospitals are of public interest, but official statistics are without context and sometimes incomplete. Some patient sub-groups are rarely studied. Our study describes re-convictions for a complete national annual high security hospital discharge cohort. We hypothesized that: established community living would precede re-conviction and that more people with personality disorder would be re-convicted, with a higher rate, than people with other disorders, even allowing for community time. Cases were identified using the special hospitals' case register; follow-up data were from multiple records sources. Seventy-four patients (38 per cent) were convicted after discharge, 26 per cent of serious offences. All 10 multiple reoffenders (>9 offences) were men. Fourteen per cent of those re-convicted had offended during institutional residence. Median time to first community re-conviction was under two years. Logistic regression analysis confirmed that people with personality disorder were seven times more likely than people with mental illness to be convicted of a serious offence after discharge. Methodological procedures that maximize validity of findings are discussed
ISSN:0007-0955
DOI:10.1093/bjc/azh054