Code switching and inverse imitation among Marijuana-using crack sellers

The line between mainstream and deviant cultures is less clear than commonly assumed in the literature, evidenced by cases drawn from a longitudinal, ethnographic study of violence in 72 inner-city New York households. Using social-learning theory and Anderson's (1999) model of street/decent�...

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Published in:The British journal of criminology
Contributors: Dunlap, Eloise (Other); Johnson, Bruce (Other); Benoit, Ellen (Other); Randolph, Doris (Other)
Format: Electronic/Print Article
Language:English
Published: 2003
In:The British journal of criminology
Year: 2003, Volume: 43, Issue: 3, Pages: 506-525
Online Access: doi
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Availability in Tübingen:Present in Tübingen.
IFK: In: Z 7
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Summary:The line between mainstream and deviant cultures is less clear than commonly assumed in the literature, evidenced by cases drawn from a longitudinal, ethnographic study of violence in 72 inner-city New York households. Using social-learning theory and Anderson's (1999) model of street/decent' code switching, we examine the extent to which three young African-American men socialized into street' culture incorporate decent' values in their lifestyles. For example, street' norms are consonant with decent' norms in that they prohibit the use of crack and heroin, but the stricture does not extend to the sale of those drugs or to the use of other illicit drugs
ISSN:0007-0955
DOI:10.1093/bjc/43.3.506