British Jews and the Racialisation of Crime in the Age of Empire

In the decades before the First World War (1880-1914), as thousands of Jews from Russia and Poland crowded into London's East End, journalists, politicians, and anti-immigrant agitators introduced a vocabulary blending racial identity and criminality. Jewish criminality', embodied in the J...

Full description

Saved in:
Bibliographic Details
Published in:The British journal of criminology
Main Author: Knepper, Paul
Format: Electronic/Print Article
Language:English
Published: 2007
In:The British journal of criminology
Year: 2007, Volume: 47, Issue: 1, Pages: 61-79
Online Access: doi
Journals Online & Print:
Drawer...
Availability in Tübingen:Present in Tübingen.
IFK: In: Z 7
Check availability: HBZ Gateway
Keywords:
Description
Summary:In the decades before the First World War (1880-1914), as thousands of Jews from Russia and Poland crowded into London's East End, journalists, politicians, and anti-immigrant agitators introduced a vocabulary blending racial identity and criminality. Jewish criminality', embodied in the Jewish prostitute and trafficker, represented a category in the making'. Looking back at this period not only affords an understanding of an early episode of the racialisation of crime, but insight into the response of a racialised population. The London-based Jewish Association for the Protection of Girls and Women (JAPGW), founded in 1885 by members of Anglo-Jewry's leading families, carried out an extensive anti-trafficking campaign. To understand why they chose to promote public awareness of Jewish involvement in the international sex trade despite the uses to which their efforts would be put by anti-Semites, it is necessary to see their outlook against the historical period in which they lived. The JAPGW countered the racialisation of crime using a conceptual vocabulary common to the era; their outlook reflected ethno-religious commitment, Victorian social convention, and faith in social science knowledge
ISSN:0007-0955