Snitching and the code of the street

Drawing from interviews with 20 active street offenders, we explore the social meaning and consequences of snitching (the exchange of incriminating information for reward or leniency). The snitch violates the code of the street and is universally despised by street criminals. Although few of our res...

Full description

Saved in:
Bibliographic Details
Published in:The British journal of criminology
Main Author: Rosenfeld, Richard (Author)
Other Authors: Jacobs, Bruce A.; Wright, Richard
Format: Electronic/Print Article
Language:English
Published: 2003
In:The British journal of criminology
Year: 2003, Volume: 43, Issue: 2, Pages: 291-309
Online Access: doi
Journals Online & Print:
Drawer...
Availability in Tübingen:Present in Tübingen.
IFK: In: Z 7
Check availability: HBZ Gateway
Keywords:
Description
Summary:Drawing from interviews with 20 active street offenders, we explore the social meaning and consequences of snitching (the exchange of incriminating information for reward or leniency). The snitch violates the code of the street and is universally despised by street criminals. Although few of our respondents reported that they had or would provide information to the police, the interviews indicate that snitching is rampant. We found that some forms of snitching are more acceptable than others, and the most offenders resist the identity of the snitch even when they perform the role. We also found evidence that police practices may contribute to the retaliatory violence associated with snitching. We conclude that expanded legal access for street criminals may reduce reliance on informers and help contain the spread of violence
ISSN:0007-0955
DOI:10.1093/bjc/43.2.291