Chronic Offenders or Socially Disadvantaged Youth? Institutionalized Males as Missing Cases in School-based Delinquency Research

Previous criminological studies comparing institutional youth populations with community samples have for the most part focused on youths institutionalized primarily as a result of involvements in delinquency. The present study compares levels of social disadvantage and criminal involvement within a...

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Published in:Journal of Scandinavian studies in criminology and crime prevention
Main Author: Shannon, David
Format: Electronic/Print Article
Language:English
Published: 2006
In:Journal of Scandinavian studies in criminology and crime prevention
Year: 2006, Volume: 7, Issue: 1, Pages: 78-100
Online Access: doi
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Availability in Tübingen:Present in Tübingen.
IFK: In: Z 181
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Summary:Previous criminological studies comparing institutional youth populations with community samples have for the most part focused on youths institutionalized primarily as a result of involvements in delinquency. The present study compares levels of social disadvantage and criminal involvement within a nationally representative sample of Swedish schoolboys with those of a national population of institutionalized males that includes both serious young offenders and youths institutionalized for other reasons. Whilst at the aggregate level, mean levels of offending are higher within the institutional sample, the institutional population includes youths from across the entire range of levels of offending. Levels of social disadvantage are substantially elevated among the institutionalized males by comparison with the school sample. The study notes that institutionalized samples, where these include both young offenders and youths institutionalized for other reasons, may provide a fruitful ground for life-course research into the way involvements in crime interact with other indicators of social disadvantage to affect the likelihood of continued marginalization into adulthood
ISSN:1404-3858