Governmentality, Critical Criminology, and the Absent Norm

Since the late 1980s, emerging Canadian criminologists have turned in great numbers to Foucault for a common theoretical, not to mention substantive, base. However, this has not fared equally well on all levels of criminological engagement. Toward an analysis of the relationship between critical cri...

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Published in:Canadian journal of criminology and criminal justice
Main Author: Lint, Willem de
Format: Print Article
Language:English
Published: 2006
In:Canadian journal of criminology and criminal justice
Year: 2006, Volume: 48, Issue: 5, Pages: 721-734
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Summary:Since the late 1980s, emerging Canadian criminologists have turned in great numbers to Foucault for a common theoretical, not to mention substantive, base. However, this has not fared equally well on all levels of criminological engagement. Toward an analysis of the relationship between critical criminology and 'governmentality,' this article proceeds with a brief examination of the constituents of disciplinary integrity. This is followed by commentary on relations of power and subordination. Drawing on Fraser's (1989) critique of Foucault, the author argues that while governmentality Slices criminal justice policy and practice to expose hidden continuities and breaks, the sharpness of the cut depends upon normative assumptions that remain contradictory or ungrounded, and this stands in the way of praxis. (English) [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
ISSN:1707-7753